Blog Response #5


URL: http://coolcatteacher.blogspot.com/
 
Title: Education Week: Copyright Confusion Is Shortchanging Our Students

Original Post:

This is an excellent article in education week discussing the copyright issues and how it is causing problems in schools with digital storytelling and video making as part of their work. Some recent court decision strike fear in the heart of teachers.

Listen to this article Listen to this article  

My Response:

This was really interesting.  I'm currently a student in the Education Department at Illinois State University, and we are learning about and working with digital stories right now.  I have definitely thought that it would only be a matter of time before copyright laws would be violated and students would be in trouble for it.  I supposed if I ever use digital stories in my classroom, I will have students strictly use original photos or videos that they have either taken or drawn themselves.  This was very interesting though, and I'm intrigued to find out more about what the court says. 

~Katherine Rosiello 

 

Blog Response #4

Title: Use of multiple literacies in province-wide standardized exams in Quebec

URL: http://www.mtl-peters.net/blog/

Original Post:

Each June, grades 6 and 11 graduating students take a province-wide standardized exam in English. Last Friday, I, and the language board consultants from the rest of the province, were the first to take a glimpse at what this year’s exams look like. The folks from theMinistère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (MELS) provided us with a 2 hour presentation of their exams and evaluation situations.

I was very impressed.

Not a multiple choice question, fill-in-blank, or short answer question in sight.

Of course, that hasn’t been the case for years anyways!

What was remarkable to me about the exams and evaluation situations was that they used multi-media, multi-modes, and multi-genres of the presentations of the texts. One of the evaluation situations created was based on the issue of how much technology is taking over our lives. Students are expected to make written responses in a forum that is to be considered an online forum. Social networks, blogs, forums and instant messaging environments are explored and even used as vehicles for communicating some of the text the students will use as they make their responses.

These exams and evaluation situations will be given to thousands of students in our province. In a sense, this will force teachers to become a bit online-savvy so they can appreciate the extent of the issues in the evaluation situations.

I am really proud of our very hip folks over at the ministry!

 My Response:

That sounds like a great idea! So many kids struggle with standardized testing today, and a lot of those hardships and frustrations can be eased through implementing different ways to administer and evaluate the tests. I really hope this idea spreads. It sounds like it will work well for students and allow them to achieve their full potential on the tests. I really hope it goes well for your province so you can share your success with other educators! 

 

~Katherine Rosiello 

 

Blog Response #3

Title:  "Visual or Virtual Think-Alouds"

 URL: http://anne.teachesme.com/

I’m continuing sharing my learnings from TRLD. In Sara Kajder’s session on “Digital Reading, Digital Writing” she shared one of the best ways I’ve heard to make active connections by readers using technology. It’s a technique she developed to get students to really think about their reading and make connections. She walked them through visual or virtual think-alouds.

She uses the time line in iMovie. Her students use the visual lines by creating digital images of their own drawings or through the use of digital images. They are making a mental movie that encourages a great deal of rereading. They reread to determine what kind of images the reading projects to them. She really has them thinking with this process.

The second line is the audio track and it is the read aloud of that text.

The third audio line is where the student performs the think aloud.

She is having her students create these monthly. She has found that students are able to articulate what they are doing as readers. They also will have an artifact of their reading at different points in time and will be able to conference around this artifact. She said it was critical that the students owned the pictures they use. The other beauty of this technique is the multiple “visual think alouds” that will be created from the same piece of text. Now that is awesome for different perspectives.

outsideinNow I have just given you a brief outline and I still have much to absorb here. I have ordered her book Bringing the Outside In so I can really process this technique and learn more from Sara. I really love the way she mixes in the visual aspects of literacy.

Sara told us how proud the students were of their work. They valued them more than the book trailers they created. Sara explained that these are the times when they are working as readers. They have never particularly fit in that role before nor have they been valued in that role. Everybody gets to see everybody else’s text if they are willing to share. All of hers shared. Isn’t this powerful? 

 

 

 

My Response:

Yes, that is definitely powerful! That sounds like such a great tool to get students interested and engaged in what they are learning. You're absolutely right when you say that by finding pictures to go along with what they're reading, the students are really thinking and understanding the readings. This is really a great way to incorporate technology into the classroom. I think what makes this especially cool is that the students seem to really enjoy what they're doing. It's a fun way for them to interpret their readings, and it's also a great tool to have for review. They can always go back and view their creations whenever they want to. I am really impressed by this activity! Thanks for sharing!

~Katherine Rosiello 

 

Blog Response #2

Title: Chasing False Gods 

URL: http://practicaltheory.org/serendipity/

Original Post:

What we have to remember, as we attempt to do that, is that we don't have to mimic the world outside our walls that seems to constantly be selling one thing or another to our kids. In fact, that might just be the worst thing we can do. 

My Response:

Chris, 

You make an excellent point when you say that there is a difference between keeping kids amused and keeping them engaged. Just the other day, my friend was talking about teaching a lesson, and he commented that when he's tried to make the topic fun in past lessons, the kids often end up learning less. I think it's really hard to find the proper balance between getting kids interested and engaged without straying away from the educational aspects. But that is exactly what teachers need to do in order to best heighten children's education.

 ~Katherine Rosiello

 

 

Blog Response #1

Title:  What A Way To Turn The Day Around

 URL:  http://123elearning.blogspot.com/

 Julie Lindsay, Head of Information Technology at Qatar Academy in Doha, described how her day was going horribly, but her students turned it around.  She said, "However, today got better quickly this afternoon when my Grade 10Flat Classroom Project 2007 class presented me with this magnificent cake during our last class for the semester... On top the words say 'Thanks for the experience Mrs Lindsay'.  Along with the cake came an enormous card with student sentiments such as '...you may have thought we were hard to control but really we were just excited!'"

 I responded, "Seeing this post really made me smile! What your students did for you must have made you feel really special. It must be so rewarding to know that your students appreciate all of your hard work and dedication. As a future teacher, I hope I can have the same type of relationship with my students. I think the most rewarding feeling will be knowing we've made a positive impact in our students lives!" 

 

~Katherine Rosiello 

 
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